RAPID DNA – Phil Pulaski

Phil Pulaski has 40 years of law enforcement experience. During 2014, Phil Pulaski retired from the New York City Police Department (NYPD) after more than 33 years of service. He spent his last five years in the NYPD as Chief of Detectives and oversaw 3,600 personnel citywide. As Chief of Detectives, Phil Pulaski also was responsible for the largest municipal forensic laboratory, crime scene unit and latent print unit in the United States.

After retiring from the NYPD, Phil Pulaski worked with his friend Chief Daniel Oates in the Miami Beach Police Department (MBPD) and helped the MBPD implement RAPID DNA technology. He was the commanding officer of the criminal investigations section and had 110 investigative personnel working for him including the crime scene unit. While working in the MBPD, Phil Pulaski became a member of the FBI RAPID DNA Task Force and American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD) RAPID DNA Task Group. Phil Pulaski is helping lead a collaborative effort within the law enforcement, legal and forensic science community to develop nationwide protocols for the use of Rapid DNA technology by police agencies in a non-laboratory environment.

RAPID DNA technology can provide results from crime scene DNA that help identify criminals in a matter of hours, rather than the months as was previously the case. Developed by 2 different private companies, the Rapid DNA instrument is approximately the size of a microwave oven and can be operated by a properly trained police officer. The RAPID DNA instruments are designed to automate the complex process of traditional DNA analysis. Working with single source biological evidence, the sample is loaded within a disposable “chip” and placed in the instrument. Within two hours, a traditional electropherogram and corresponding DNA profile are generated.

The FBI RAPID DNA Task Force published a document entitled “Non-CODIS RAPID DNA Considerations and Best Practices for Law Enforcement Use” that contains guidelines for police agencies implementing RAPID DNA technology in a non-laboratory environment. The FBI RAPID DNA Task Force also published a document entitled “Rapid DNA Testing for Non-CODIS Uses: Considerations for Court” that contains guidelines reading discovery, pre-trial suppression motions, Daubert hearings and trial testimony. Both documents provide a blueprint for police agencies who want to successfully implement a high quality RAPID DNA program in a non-laboratory environment.

RAPID DNA 7-2021

Phil Pulaski has 40 years of law enforcement experience. During 2014, Phil Pulaski retired from the New York City Police Department (NYPD) after more than 33 years of service. He spent his last five years in the NYPD as Chief of Detectives and oversaw 3,600 personnel citywide. As Chief of Detectives, Phil Pulaski also was responsible for the largest municipal forensic laboratory, crime scene unit and latent print unit in the United States.

After retiring from the NYPD, Phil Pulaski worked with his friend Chief Daniel Oates in the Miami Beach Police Department (MBPD) and helped the MBPD implement RAPID DNA technology. He was the commanding officer of the criminal investigations section and had 110 investigative personnel working for him including the crime scene unit. While working in the MBPD, Phil Pulaski became a member of the FBI RAPID DNA Task Force and American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD) RAPID DNA Task Group. Phil Pulaski is helping lead a collaborative effort within the law enforcement, legal and forensic science community to develop nationwide protocols for the use of Rapid DNA technology by police agencies in a non-laboratory environment.

RAPID DNA technology can provide results from crime scene DNA that help identify criminals in a matter of hours, rather than the months as was previously the case. Developed by 2 different private companies, the Rapid DNA instrument is approximately the size of a microwave oven and can be operated by a properly trained police officer. The RAPID DNA instruments are designed to automate the complex process of traditional DNA analysis. Working with single source biological evidence, the sample is loaded within a disposable “chip” and placed in the instrument. Within two hours, a traditional electropherogram and corresponding DNA profile are generated.

The FBI RAPID DNA Task Force published a document entitled “Non-CODIS RAPID DNA Considerations and Best Practices for Law Enforcement Use” that contains guidelines for police agencies implementing RAPID DNA technology in a non-laboratory environment. The FBI RAPID DNA Task Force also published a document entitled “Rapid DNA Testing for Non-CODIS Uses: Considerations for Court” that contains guidelines reading discovery, pre-trial suppression motions, Daubert hearings and trial testimony. Both documents provide a blueprint for police agencies who want to successfully implement a high quality RAPID DNA program in a non-laboratory environment.

Coronavirus COVID-19

Phil Pulaski has 38 years of law enforcement experience. During March 2014, Phil Pulaski retired as the New York City Police Department’s (NYPD) Chief of Detectives with more than 33 years of experience managing NYPD patrol, investigative, counterterrorism and other public safety activities. During the October 2001 anthrax terrorist attack, he was placed in-command of the FBI/NYPD Joint Terrorist Task Force (JTTF) by Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik. On October 19, 2001, the NY Post newspaper published an article stating that Police Commissioner Kerik had selected Phil Pulaski “as the department’s bio-terrorism czar”. Together with his FBI counterpart, SAC Gregory Jones, Phil Pulaski and the JTTF team conducted a “joint epidemiologic/law enforcement investigation” in collaboration with the US Public Health Service, US Centers for Disease Control and the NYC Department of Health.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease that was first identified in December 2019. The World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern regarding COVID-19 on January 30, 2020, and later declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Since the start of the pandemic, more than 161 million COVID-19 cases have been confirmed and more than 3.35 million people have died from the virus. The COVID-19 virus pandemic is one of the deadliest pandemics in human history.

People infected with the COVID-19 virus experience a wide range of symptoms. Some infected people are asymptomatic and do not even know they have been infected. Others have very severe symptoms and ultimately die from the virus. Transmission of the virus is believed to occur when people are exposed to respiratory droplets or small airborne particles exhaled by an infected person. The virus particles may be inhaled or may reach the mouth, nose, or eyes of a person through touching with contaminated hands. Studies show that people remain contagious for up to 20 days, and can spread the virus even if they do not develop any symptoms.

The pandemic has resulted in significant global social and economic disruption including the largest global recession since the Great Depression. Additionally, it has led to significant shortages of essential goods and supplies. In particular food shortages have resulted from agricultural disruption and panic buying. The pandemic also has raised issues regarding the balance between public health mandates and individual rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution.

Phil Pulaski and NYPD Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly

Phil Pulaski has 38 years of law enforcement experience, and served for more than 33 years with the New York City Police Department (NYPD) where, as a senior police executive, he managed patrol, investigative, counterterrorism and other public safety operations. From 2002 to 2013, Phil Pulaski worked for NYPD Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly in numerous exceptionally mission-critical positions. Commissioner Kelly thought very highly of Phil Pulaski and promoted him to the absolute top ranks of the NYPD an amazing 3 times in 12 years.

Upon assuming office in January 2002, Commissioner Kelly chose Phil Pulaski to be the commanding officer of NYPD’s extremely critical counter-terrorist commands: first the FBI/NYPD Joint Terrorist Task Force (JTTF), then the Counterterrorism Bureau and then the Intelligence Division. Several serious terrorist attacks on NYC were prevented as a result of the outstanding efforts of JTTF, Counterterrorism Bureau and Intelligence Division personnel. Phil Pulaski was subsequently promoted to Deputy Police Commissioner of Operations where he was responsible for NYPD’s crime reduction programs and, together with Chief of Department Joseph Esposito, directed the nationally recognized COMPSTAT (short for COMPuter STATistics) process. In 2009, Commissioner Kelly promoted Phil Pulaski to the legendary rank of Chief of Detectives. As NYPD’s Chief of Detectives, Phil Pulaski was responsible for 3,600 personnel who, during 2013, investigated more than 256,000 felony and misdemeanor crimes (including 335 homicides), and arrested more than 39,000 offenders.

During 2015, Commissioner Kelly’s book entitled Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting Its Empire City was published and rapidly became a best-seller. In his book, Commissioner Kelly describes Phil Pulaski as an “innovator” and “major contributor” to the success of the NYPD who “was constantly pushing the Detective Bureau forward, developing new ways to harness burgeoning technologies to help solve crimes.” The book chronicles Commissioner Kelly’s incredible life of service to the United States and New York City. Raymond Kelly is the longest serving Police Commissioner in New York City history and served twice as Police Commissioner: 1st under Mayor David Dinkins in the early 1990s, and 2nd under Mayor Michael Bloomberg from 2002 to 2013.

A major focus of the book is Raymond Kelly’s 2nd appointment as Police Commissioner and his incredible success in making New York City the safest big-city in America with regard to both crime and terrorism while also maintaining a 75% approval rating from the City’s 8 million residents. The book also describes Commissioner Kelly’s incredible accomplishments as a United States Marine Corps officer during the Viet Nam war, undersecretary of the US Treasury for enforcement, commissioner of the US Customs Bureau and commander of the international police force in Haiti.